Love & Marriage, Quality Assurance & Development

(6 minute read)

I’ve had the benefit of both doing Quality Assurance and Software Development for many years (usually not at the same time.) Interestingly enough, doing QA has made me a better developer and being a developer has made me better at writing comprehensive testplans. What astounds me about these two roles that work together on a nearly daily basis is they have a communication level that is lower than the US and Russia in the mid 80s.

I find it hard to believe but nobody really talks about how QA should work with developers and how developers should work with QA. I’ve worked on great teams where communication has been great and “the talk” really isn’t needed and I’ve worked on great teams where “the talk” needs to happen and QA/dev are ready to have a shoot out at high noon (Note: The talk is not the differentiator of a good or bad team)

The QA Dev relationship is just that, a relationship, a marriage, the good, the bad, the ugly. It will have its ups and downs but the one thing that remains key to any type of good relationship is having a good basic understanding of your role in the relationship and communication. If you picked up on the fact that I said it would be one thing but listed two then you are probably on the QA side of the relationship.

The following rules are not tied to any specific methodology and I don’t get technical for things like coverage etc. This post is bring to light the interaction (or lack of) between the two parties.

Basic Rules You Should Follow to Make Life Suck Less (BRYSFMLS)

Your basic job:

Before you hand over your work:

When testing:

When you find a problem:

When working with tickets:

When to automate testing:

When to be embarrassed:

When not to be embarrassed:

When to talk to your significant other:

When to get pissed off/annoyed/angry:

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